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2010 August — Shocklee Entertainment Universe ● The Future Frequency

Shocklee Innertainment Panel Series: American Hot Soundtracks

American Hot Soundtracks the discussion; took place at Remix Hotel NYC on June 23, 2006. A fine cast moderated by Rashidi Hendrix of Reach Global Music Publishing discussed issues including: how music gets placed in film, TV & commercials, who’s doing the placing, how money is made and what the current demands and pressures involved are.  Check the audio – and then join us in the network to discuss – pen and pad is a must.

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Shocklee Innertainment Panel Series: Get Heard Now! The Distribution Panel

Get Heard Now! The Distribution Panel took place at Remix Hotel Atlanta on September 8, 2006. Moderated by our own Hank Shocklee and featuring a cast of knowledgeable industry players, the changing distribution model and distribution 101 for independents is discussed.

Take a listen to this lively discussion and find out how you can go about setting up your distribution, who the key players are and how both traditional retail & online distribution is changing.

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Comedies Of Fair U$E Symposium @ NYU

The following panel discussion took place as part of “The Comedies of Fair U$e,” a conference on copyright and intellectual property that took place April 28 – 30, 2006 at NYU.

Organized by NYU journalism Professor Rob Boynton, in conjunction with the New York Institute for the Humanities at NYU, which is under the direction of Lawrence Weschler the event featured: moderator Kembrew McLeod, a documentary filmmaker and scholar of intellectual property law; Dr. Lawrence Ferrara, Chair of the Department of Music and Performing Arts at NYU and a specialist in copyright law; Claudia Gonson, drummer and manager for the pop group The Magnetic Fields; Hank Shocklee, legendary producer and founding member of Public Enemy; and Paul Miller, a.k.a. DJ Spooky, whose book Rhythm Science was published last year by MIT Press.

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SAMPLE THIS! Q&A with Hank Shocklee

Sample This! Know How to Stay One Step Ahead of Lawyers and Publishing Companies

By Hank Shocklee

Originally Published in Remix Magazine Vol. 7, No. 1 (January 2005)

Since 1979, hip-hop sampling has been a part of the recorded musical landscape. It has become a multicultural phenomenon that changed the way people produce and listen to modern music. But the publishing companies that hold the rights to the original compositions of popularly sampled songs have been on the offense, trying to figure out how to profit from the use of these songs. Once they figured out that records were not only sampling tiny fragments but also looping the entire arrangement of songs, publishing companies and songwriters started filing lawsuits all over the country.

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How Copyright Law Changed Hip Hop

How Copyright Law Changed Hip Hop

An interview with Public Enemy’s Hank Shocklee and Chuck D
by Kembrew McLeod

Originally Published in Stay Free Magazine Copyright Issue #20 | Fall 2002

When Public Enemy released It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, in 1988, it was as if the album had landed from another planet. Nothing sounded like it at the time. It Takes a Nation came frontloaded with sirens, squeals, and squawks that augmented the chaotic, collaged backing tracks over which P.E. frontman Chuck D laid his politically and poetically radical rhymes. He rapped about white supremacy, capitalism, the music industry, black nationalism, and–in the case of “Caught, Can I Get a Witness?”– digital sampling: “CAUGHT, NOW IN COURT ‘ CAUSE I STOLE A BEAT / THIS IS A SAMPLING SPORT / MAIL FROM THE COURTS AND JAIL / CLAIMS I STOLE THE BEATS THAT I RAIL … I FOUND THIS MINERAL THAT I CALL A BEAT / I PAID ZERO.”

In the mid- to late 1980s, hip-hop artists had a very small window of opportunity to run wild with the newly emerging sampling technologies before the record labels and lawyers started paying attention. No one took advantage of these technologies more effectively than Public Enemy, who put hundreds of sampled aural fragments into It Takes a Nation and stirred them up to create a new, radical sound that changed the way we hear music. But by 1991, no one paid zero for the records they sampled without getting sued. They had to pay a lot.

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